#TravelThursday – Thanksgiving Traffic!

Posted November 26th, 2014 at 12:15 pm (UTC-4)
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Hello, and happy #TravelThursday!

We are in the middle of one of the busiest travel weeks of the year here in the U.S., as people travel to see families and friends for the Thanksgiving holiday.

Nearly 44 million people travel during the Thanksgiving holiday, with about 90 percent traveling by car!

Here are a few common expressions used to describe all of the craziness that comes with traveling during one of the busiest times of year.

With so many cars on the roads, you’re bound to get stuck in traffic or encounter a traffic jam. This happens when traffic is at or near a standstill because of road construction, an accident, or just a very large number of vehicles on the road.

On the roads and highways, cars are bumper to bumper — an expression used to describe vehicles that are in a line one after another and are moving very slowly or not at all! The ‘bumper’ is a bar across the front or back of a car that reduces the damage if the car hits something.

Let’s hope you stay patient and don’t have road rage — anger caused by the stress involved in driving a car in difficult conditions.

Of course, airports, train stations, and bus stations are also packed with people. In fact, we can say people are packed like sardines — an expression that means many people are in a relatively small space. A sardine is a very small fish. You can buy many, many sardines in a small can, which is, of course, the inspiration for this common expression.

While all of the crowds and traffic can drive you crazy, it’s worth it to have the chance to spend the holidays with family and friends!

What are the busiest travel times in your country? Share a travel experience you have had during those times!



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