Water on the Moon

Posted May 31st, 2011 at 5:58 pm (UTC+0)
1 comment

Looking up at the Moon from our blue planet Earth, it’s hard to see anything other than a barren landscape.  Devoid of any life, it’s a visual study in dusty shades of gray.

But recently scientists from Case Western Reserve University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, and Brown University have found that parts of the Moon’s interior contains as much water as the upper mantle of the Earth, more than 100 times what was measured before.

Examining moon material brought back to earth back in 1972 by the US Apollo 17 mission, the researchers were able to find water along with other volatile elements such as fluorine, chlorine and sulfur.

One of the scientists involved with this discovery is James Van Orman, a professor of geological studies at Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio.  “These samples provide the best window we have to the amount of water in the interior of the Moon,” says Van Orman.  “The interior seems to be pretty similar to the interior of the Earth, from what we know about water abundance.”

This discovery seems to strengthen the theory that the Moon and Earth have a common origin but at the same time may force scientists to reconsider the current theory of the process: that a huge impact in Earth’s early history ejected material into orbit that became the Moon.

Published in the May 26 edition of Science Express, this finding is said to challenge previously made assumptions on how the Moon came to be and provides new clues into the process of lunar formation.

One Response to “Water on the Moon”

  1. KARUNA KARA SWAIN,CHATRAPUR,ORISSA says:

    world scientists should give stress and more importance on the issue of water on moon which is nearer to earth.presence of water strengthens the suspicion of living creatures in moon.

About Science World

Science World

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online magazine covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Hosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other news makers.

Listen to a Recent Program

Listen Sidebar

Broadcast Schedule

Broadcast Schedule

Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200.

Science World may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).

Contact Us

E-Mail
science@voanews.com

Postal Mail
Science World
Voice of America
330 Independence Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20237
USA