Science Images of the Week

Posted February 8th, 2013 at 7:20 pm (UTC+0)
1 comment

NASA's Cassini spacecraft took this natural color composite photo of Saturn (Photo: NASA)

This natural color composite photo of Saturn was taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. (NASA)

A baby Adélie penguin nuzzles up to its mother. This photo was taken inside one of three bird colonies on Ross Island near Antarctica. (Photo: Penguinscience.com)

A baby Adélie penguin nuzzles up to its mother inside one of three bird colonies on Ross Island near Antarctica. (Penguinscience.com)

Here's A close-up photo of Robonaut 2 - R2, the first dexterous humanoid robot in space that was taken inside the International Space Station's Destiny laboratory. By the way you can see the reflections of NASA astronaut Kevin Ford on R2's helmet visor. (Photo: NASA)

This is Robonaut 2-R2, the first dexterous humanoid robot in space, in an image taken inside the International Space Station.  NASA astronaut Kevin Ford’s reflection can be seen on R2′s helmet visor. (NASA)

Lava from a tiny lava pond flows on the north side of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. (Photo: USGS)

Lava from a lava pond, below the peak, flows on the north side of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano. (USGS)

Using data from the Hubble Space Telescope this is an assembled photo illustration of the magnificent spiral galaxy M106. (Image: R. Gendler/NASA)

Photo illustration of the magnificent spiral galaxy M106, assembled using data from the Hubble Space Telescope. (NASA)

This is a photomicrograph of a brown fat cell (brown adipocyte) that was taken from a muscle stem cell (Image: Alessandra Pasut, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute)

This photograph, taken through a microscope, is of a brown fat cell (brown adipocyte) taken from a muscle stem cell. (Alessandra Pasut, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute)

Technicians pack-up and prepare NASA's Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) satellite for its scheduled launch on Monday, Feb. 11th at 1800 UTC (Photo: NASA)

Technicians prepare NASA’s Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) satellite for its scheduled launch on Monday, Feb. 11 at 1800 UTC. (NASA)

When sockeye salmon migrate from salt water to fresh water, they change color--going from their ocean colors of mostly silver to red when in fresh water (Photo: Dr. Tom Quinn, University of Washington)

Sockeye salmon migrate from salt water to fresh water in British Columbia’s Fraser River, changing from their silvery ocean colors to red in fresh water. (Tom Quinn, University of Washington)

The Orion nebula is featured in this sweeping image from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE. (Image: NASA)

The Orion nebula is showcased in this sweeping image from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). (NASA)

An Atlas V rocket carrying NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-K (TDRS-K), streaks past the Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Complex 39 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida  (Photo: NASA)

An Atlas V rocket carrying NASA’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-K (TDRS-K) streaks past a building at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (NASA)

Rick Pantaleo
Rick Pantaleo maintains the Science World blog and writes stories for VOA’s web and radio on a variety of science, technology and health topics. He also occasionally appears on various VOA programs to talk about the latest scientific news. Rick joined VOA in 1992 after a 20 year career in commercial broadcasting.

Latest Science in a Minute Podcast

One Response to “Science Images of the Week”

  1. Emmanuel Ebube says:

    Thanks for these inspiring images. They take one’s mind off the chaos on earth, at least for a blissful while. I must still insist that exploring the vicinity of the speed of light is where our research resources should be concentrated. This may be a difficult very expensive terrain to explore, but then this is where the treasure cove of all discoveries lies. The mysteries of the universe remain hidden here, including that of life and death and eternity in a relativistic timeless world. Strangely enough this type of exploration would not require any space travels, just some supercomputing facilities and lots of imagination, weird unconventional imagination. We need lots of these if humanity is to break from its routine of exploring just matter, when the universe is clearly in two distinct interconnected parts, matter and non-matter.
    The speed of light, even just the asymptotic approaches to it given that it is unattainable, is the only gateway between the two worlds, that of time-sequenced events of the physical world we exist in, and the dilated time or timeless world our minds are capable of accessing. Science now has the technology, and our civilization is uniquely qualified to throw open the lid of this unexplored world without losing any more time, an opportunity denied all previous civilizations. This is the only way we could explore anything outside our solar system, in a universe that is so vast we could never reach the nearest star of our own galaxy with billions of stars, being just one of billions of galaxies. It is like spending all our time examining, or exploring, a grain of sand on the sea shore, and being thrilled by the marvels of it. Perhaps more importantly, the problem of human mortality would come under the searchlight when time becomes dilated, or static, in the speed of light domain, and a homogeneous medium of past, present, and the future could be conceptualized as reality.

    The writer is a science author