Science Images of the Week

Posted April 19th, 2013 at 7:08 pm (UTC+0)
2 comments

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of recent M6.5 class flare. This image shows a combination of light in wavelengths of 131 and 171 Angstroms - light wavelength measurement.- (NASA/SDO)

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of a recent M6.5 class flare. This image shows a combination of light in wavelengths of 131 and 171 Angstroms – light wavelength measurement. (NASA)

This image shows the beautiful bright orange-colored Perrottetia dermapyrrhosa, one of the three new species of the snail that were recently found in Thailand. (Somsak Panha)

The bright orange-colored Perrottetia dermapyrrhosa, one of three new species of the snail recently found in Thailand. (Somsak Panha)

Using 10 different pointings of the Chandra X-ray telescope astronomers created this detailed image of the remnants from the SN 1006 supernova that was created when a white dwarf star exploded. (NASA/CXC/Middlebury College/F.Winkler et al.)

Images captured by the Chandra X-ray telescope helped astronomers create this detailed image of the remnants from the SN 1006 supernova, created when a white dwarf star exploded. (NASA)

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics have come up with a unique new keyboard called KALQ that they say will offer mobile phone and tablet users substantial peformance advantages over the traditional qwerty keyboards now being offered. (Max Planck Institute for Informatics)

Scientists think they’ve come up with a better way for mobile phone and tablet users to type their text messages and tweets. Instead of the traditional QWERTY keyboard, the new KALQ system allows people to use their thumbs for up to 34 percent faster and more comfortable typing. (Max Planck Institute for Informatics)

Artist's concept of a solar-electric-powered spacecraft that will be designed to capture a small near-Earth asteroid and relocate it safely close to the Earth-moon system so astronauts can explore it. (NASA)

Artist’s concept of a solar-electric-powered spacecraft  which would be designed to capture a small near-Earth asteroid and relocate it safely close to the Earth-moon system for astronauts to study. (NASA)

A researcher holds a ribbon of electronics including ultra-miniaturized LEDs that can be injected deep into the brain to help scientists study the mysteries of the brain.  (John A. Rogers, University of Illinois/Beckman Institute)

A researcher holds a ribbon of electronics including ultra-miniaturized LEDs that can be injected deep into the brain to help scientists study the mysteries of the brain. (John A. Rogers, University of Illinois/Beckman Institute)

Artist’s concept of a dense, dead star called a white dwarf crossing in front of a small, red star. The white dwarf’s gravity is so great it bends and magnifies light from the red star. NASA’s Kepler space telescope recently observed this effect in a double-star system called KOI-256 (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Artist’s concept of a dense, dead star called a white dwarf crossing in front of a small, red star. The white dwarf’s gravity is so great it bends and magnifies light from the red star. NASA’s Kepler space telescope recently observed this effect in a double-star system called KOI-256. (NASA)

A new species of an insect called the leaf miner was recently discovered in the depths of the Brazilian jungle. (Gilson R.P. Moreira)

A new species of an insect called the leaf miner was recently discovered in the depths of the Brazilian jungle. (Gilson R.P. Moreira)

The tip of the "wing" of the Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy is a small galaxy about 200,000 light-years way that orbits our own Milky Way spiral galaxy. (NASA/CXC/JPL-Caltech/STScI)

The tip of the “wing” of the Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy is a small galaxy about 200,000 light-years away that orbits our own Milky Way spiral galaxy. (NASA)

A NASA technician inspects the inlet ducting of the Honeywell ALF 502 engine, which allows engine manufacturers to simulate flying through the upper atmosphere where large amounts of icing particles can be ingested, causing flame outs or a loss of engine power on aircraft. (NASA)

2 Responses to “Science Images of the Week”

  1. [...] Science Images of the Week Images captured by the Chandra X-ray telescope helped astronomers create this detailed image of the remnants from the SN 1006 supernova, created when a white dwarf star exploded. (NASA). Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics have come … Read more on Voice of America (blog) [...]

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