Science Images of the Week

Posted July 18th, 2014 at 5:48 pm (UTC+0)
1 comment

Here’s an entertaining animated image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that was take on July 14, 2014 by OSIRIS, the scientific imaging system aboard the European Space Agency’s comet hunting spacecraft Rosetta.  The image was taken from a distance of around 12,000 km and is made up of a sequence of 36 images that were taken once every 20 minutes. (© ESA/Rosetta/IMPS)

Here’s an animated image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken July 14, 2014, by OSIRIS, the scientific imaging system aboard the European Space Agency’s comet hunting spacecraft Rosetta. The image was taken from a distance of around 12,000 km and is made up of a sequence of 36 images snapped once every 20 minutes. (© ESA/Rosetta/IMPS)

German astronaut and photo bug Alexander Gerst, currently a crewmember aboard the ISS, Tweeted another spectacular photo from space on July 17, 2014.  Here you see the Earth as the Sun’s light reflects off the water. (Reuters/NASA)

German astronaut Alexander Gerst, a crew member aboard the International Space Station (ISS), tweeted this spectacular photo of Earth with the Sun reflecting off the water,  taken July 17, 2014. (Reuters/NASA)

 

On July 17, 2014 Russian scientists said that they believe that changing temperatures may be responsible for creating this 60-meter wide crater that was recently discovered in far northern Siberia.  Scientists from the Scientific Research Center of the Arctic developed the theory since they found that 80% of the giant crater is made of ice and that there were no traces of an explosion, which eliminated a meteorite strike as its origin. (AP)

Russian scientists believe changing temperatures could be responsible for creating this 60-meter-wide crater recently discovered in far northern Siberia. This frame grab was made July 16, 2014. Scientists developed the theory after determining that 80 percent of the giant crater is made of ice and they found no traces of an explosion, which eliminates a meteorite strike as its origin. (AP)

 

Carrying over 1,361 kg of supplies for the International Space Station, the Cygnus spacecraft aboard this Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket launches from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, July 13, 2014. (Reuters/NASA)

The Cygnus spacecraft aboard this Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket launches from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, July 13, 2014, carrying over 1,361 kg of supplies for the International Space Station (ISS). (Reuters/NASA)

Three days after its launch here’s the Cygnus cargo spacecraft, shown here in a NASA-TV screen grab, as it’s being grasped by the ISS’ robotic arm, Canadarm on July 16, 2014.  (AP/NASA-TV)

Three days after its launch, the Cygnus cargo spacecraft, shown here in a NASA-TV screen grab, is grasped by the International Space Station’s robotic arm, July 16, 2014. (AP/NASA-TV)

Taking a leisurely stroll down a set of stairs is the latest version of Honda's Asimo humanoid robot.  With enhanced intelligence and more nimble hand dexterity, the new robot was introduced to the public at an exhibition held near Brussels on July 16, 2014.  (Reuters)

Taking a leisurely stroll down a set of stairs is the latest version of Honda’s Asimo humanoid robot. With enhanced intelligence and more nimble hand dexterity, the new robot was introduced to the public at an exhibition near Brussels on July 16, 2014. (Reuters)

Officials with NASA’s Curiosity mission on July 15, 2014 released a photo of this rock that the Mars rover encountered in its travels across the Red Planet.  Scientists said the rock is actually an iron meteorite.  The scientists named the meteorite "Lebanon". (NASA)

Officials with NASA’s Curiosity mission released a mosaic photo, on July 15, 2014, of a rock encountered by the Mars rover. Scientists said the object is actually an iron meteorite they’ve named “Lebanon”. (NASA)

European Space Agency engineers are shown in this photo released on July 15, 2014, performing final tests on its Intermediate experimental Vehicle, IXV.  The engineers to make sure that the spacecraft can withstand the extreme conditions it will experience from liftoff to separation from its Vega rocket during its scheduled November 2014 launch. (© ESA)

In this photo released July 15, 2014, European Space Agency engineers perform final tests on the Intermediate experimental Vehicle, IXV, ensuring the spacecraft can withstand the extreme conditions it will encounter from lift off to separation from its Vega rocket, during its scheduled Nov. 2014 launch. (© ESA)

On Saturday, July 12, 2014 the world was treated to a remarkable sight in the night sky; a “supermoon”.  Also called a perigee moon, it’s shown here rising over the Queens borough of New York.  Scientists say that a “supermoon” takes place when the moon is close to the horizon, making it appear larger and much brighter than other “regular” full moons. (AP)

On July 12, 2014 ,the world was treated to the remarkable sight  of a “supermoon” in the night sky. Also called a perigee moon, it’s shown here rising over the Queens borough of New York. Scientists say a supermoon occurs when the moon is close to the horizon, making it appear larger and brighter than other full moons. (AP)

This is NASA’s custom-fitted research C-130 aircraft as its being prepared for a series of research flights on July 15, 2014.  The customized airplane will fly the skies above an are of the Southern Rocky Mountains, in Colorado, known as the Front Range to conduct detailed studies of local air pollution. (AP)

This is NASA’s custom-fitted research C-130 aircraft, on July 15, 2014, as it’s prepared for a series of research flights. The customized airplane will fly the skies above an area of the Southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado, known as the Front Range, to conduct detailed studies of local air pollution. (AP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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