Science Images for September, 2014

Posted September 29th, 2014 at 7:23 pm (UTC-5)
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The colorful fish (Pterophyllum Scalare var.) glowing in this aquarium have been genetically-engineered.   The fish were on display from September 12th through September 15th at the 2014 Taiwan Aquarium Expo in Taipei September 12, 2014.  (Reuters)

The colorful fish (Pterophyllum Scalare var.) glowing in this aquarium have been genetically-engineered. The fish were on display from September 12th through September 15th at the 2014 Taiwan Aquarium Expo in Taipei September 12, 2014. (Reuters)

The Soyuz TMA-14M rocket carrying three new crewmembers to the International Space Station launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, Sept. 26, 2014. (NASA, Aubrey Gemignani)

The Soyuz TMA-14M rocket carrying three new crewmembers to the International Space Station launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, Sept. 26, 2014. (NASA, Aubrey Gemignani)

Japan’s Mount Ontake erupted on Saturday, September 27, 2014.  Here you can see smoke rising from the volcano, located in central Japan.  On Sunday, September 28, 2014, local officials and media said that four hikers were confirmed dead and an additional 27 bodies had been found on the mountain. (Reuters/Kyodo)

Japan’s Mount Ontake erupted on Saturday, September 27, 2014. Here you can see smoke rising from the volcano, located in central Japan. On Sunday local officials and media said that four hikers were confirmed dead and an additional 27 bodies had been found on the mountain. (Reuters/Kyodo)

The sun-powered Solar Impulse 2 aircraft during a training flight at its base in Payerne, Switzerland on September 27, 2014.  The solar plane will attempt an around the world flight in March 2015 from Abu Dhabi. (Reuters)

Here’s the sun-powered Solar Impulse 2 aircraft during a training flight near its base in Payerne, Switzerland on September 27, 2014. The solar plane will attempt an around the world flight in March 2015 from Abu Dhabi. (Reuters)

A man attending the opening of the second annual Bulletproof Biohacking Conference tries out a gyro device on September 26, 2014.  The conference being held in California features innovative technology that optimizes a human’s mental and physical performance. (Reuters)

A man attending the opening of the second annual Bulletproof Biohacking Conference tries out a gyro device on September 26, 2014. The conference being held in California features innovative technology that optimizes a human’s mental and physical performance. (Reuters)

These parabolic mirrors are tracking the sun at a research facility in Israel’s Negev desert on September 9, 2014. The solar power company Brenmiller Energy said that their unique new system of parabolic mirrors can provide a more efficient way to store heat from the sun and will allow thermal solar power i plants to run at full capacity both during the day and at night. (Reuters)

These parabolic mirrors are tracking the sun at a research facility in Israel’s Negev desert on September 9, 2014. The solar power company Brenmiller Energy said their unique new system of parabolic mirrors can provide a more efficient way to store heat from the sun and will allow thermal solar power plants to run at full capacity both during the day and at night. (Reuters)

Here’s a look of the powerful engines of the Soyuz-FG booster rocket that ferried a new crew to the International Space Station on September 26, 2014.  The photo was taken at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. (NASA, Aubrey Gemignani)

Here’s a look of the powerful engines of the Soyuz-FG booster rocket that ferried a new crew to the International Space Station.. The photo was taken at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. (NASA, Aubrey Gemignani)

This set of giant panda triplets, were born recently with the help of artificial insemination at the Chimelong Safari Park in Guangzhou, Guangdong province.  The trio of baby pandas opened their eyes on September 19, 2014. (Reuters)

This set of giant panda triplets were conceived with the help of artificial insemination at the Chimelong Safari Park in Guangzhou, Guangdong province. The trio of baby pandas opened their eyes on September 19, 2014. (Reuters)

NASA, astronaut Randy Bresnik prepares to enter The Boeing Company's CST-100 spacecraft for a fit check evaluation on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014.  Both Bresnik and fellow astronaut Serena Aunon spent four hours testing their maneuverability in the spacecraft at Boeing’s Houston facility. (NASA)

NASA, astronaut Randy Bresnik prepares to enter The Boeing Company’s CST-100 spacecraft for a fit check evaluation on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. Both Bresnik and fellow astronaut Serena Aunon spent four hours testing their maneuverability in the spacecraft at Boeing’s Houston facility. (NASA)

Meet the "Murata Cheerleaders", the latest concept robots from Japan's Murata Manufacturing Co.  The team of cheerleading robots, seen here at an unveiling event in Tokyo on September 25, 2014, use the latest sensing and communication technology to balance on balls and synchronize as a team. (Reuters/Yuya Shino)

Meet the “Murata Cheerleaders”, the latest concept robots from Japan’s Murata Manufacturing Co. The team of cheerleading robots, seen here at an unveiling event in Tokyo on September 25, 2014, use the latest sensing and communication technology to balance on balls and synchronize as a team. (Reuters/Yuya Shino)

This is an extreme ultra-violet wavelength image of a powerful X1.6 class solar flare, which can be seen in the middle of the sun.  This image captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on at 1745 UTC on Sept. 10, 2014. (NASA)

This is an extreme ultra-violet wavelength image of a powerful X1.6 class solar flare, which can be seen in the middle of the sun. This image was captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on at 1745 UTC on Sept. 10, 2014. (NASA)

In a photo taken on September 29, 2014, this is the ‘Corpse Flower’ otherwise known as the Titan Arum (Amorphophallus titanum) in bloom at Switzerland’s Botanical Garden at the University of Basel.  The Corpse Flower, one of the world's largest and rare tropical flowering plants, got its nickname from the incredibly strong and foul odor it emits.  After blooming for only a couple of days, the plant then wilts and dies. (Reuters)

In a photo taken on September 29, 2014, this is the ‘Corpse Flower’ otherwise known as the Titan Arum (Amorphophallus titanum) is seen blooming at Switzerland’s Botanical Garden at the University of Basel. The Corpse Flower, one of the world’s largest and rare tropical flowering plants, got its nickname from the incredibly strong and foul odor it emits. After blooming for only a couple of days, the plant wilts and dies. (Reuters)

This is the primary landing site on the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that was selected by the European Space Agency for its Philae lander.  The photo was taken by the Rosetta spacecraft on September 21, 2014.  Before picking this location, known to ESA scientists as ‘landing site J’, the space agency had considered a number of other touch down spots for its lander that is scheduled to be sent  down to the comet by the Rosetta in November 2014. (© ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM)

This is a close-up of the primary landing site on the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that was selected by the European Space Agency for its Philae lander. The photo was taken by the Rosetta spacecraft on September 21, 2014. Before picking this location, known to ESA scientists as ‘landing site J’, the space agency had considered a number of other touch down spots for its lander that is scheduled to be sent down to the comet by the Rosetta in November 2014. (© ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM)

A scientist counts male and female genetically modified aedes aegypti mosquito pupae with a microscope at a laboratory in Panama City, on Sept. 26, 2014. Scientists recently released these genetically modified mosquitos in Panama to fight and control populations of this species of mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. (AP)

A scientist counts male and female genetically modified aedes aegypti mosquito pupae with a microscope at a laboratory in Panama City, on Sept. 26, 2014. Scientists recently released these genetically modified mosquitoes in Panama to fight and control populations of the mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. (AP)

NASA's DHC-3 Otter plane surveys mountain glaciers in Alaska as a part of Operation IceBridge-Alaska on September 18, 2014.  Operation IceBridge-Alaska will provide scientists an understanding of how rising temperatures are affecting the Arctic.   The NASA project was designed to address questions about the relationship between retreating sea ice and the Arctic climate.  (NASA)

NASA’s DHC-3 Otter plane surveys mountain glaciers in Alaska as a part of Operation IceBridge-Alaska on September 18, 2014. Operation IceBridge-Alaska will provide scientists an understanding of how rising temperatures are affecting the Arctic. The NASA project was designed to address questions about the relationship between retreating sea ice and the Arctic climate. (NASA)

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft recently snapped this rare photo of three of Saturn's moons surrounding the planet’s ‘F-Ring’.  Each of these moons are quite different from one another. The largest of the trio Tethys, seen in the center, is round and has a variety of landscapes across its surface.  Hyperion, which can been seen to the upper-left of Tethys, is known to astronomers as the "wild one" because it has such a chaotic spin.  And then there is Prometheus, seen as the tiny dot just to the lower left of the ring.  This moon of Saturn, called a ‘Shepard satellite’, by astronomers helps keep an edge on the planet’s ‘F-Ring’. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft recently snapped this rare photo of three of Saturn’s moons surrounding the planet’s ‘F-Ring’. Each of these moons are quite different from one another. The largest of the trio, Tethys, seen in the center, is round and has a variety of landscapes across its surface. Hyperion, which can been seen to the upper-left of Tethys, is known to astronomers as the “wild one” because it has such a chaotic spin. And then there is Prometheus, seen as the tiny dot just to the lower left of the ring. This moon, called a ‘Shepard satellite’, by astronomers, helps keep an edge on the planet’s ‘F-Ring’. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

Rick Pantaleo
Rick Pantaleo maintains the Science World blog and writes stories for VOA’s web and radio on a variety of science, technology and health topics. He also occasionally appears on various VOA programs to talk about the latest scientific news. Rick joined VOA in 1992 after a 20 year career in commercial broadcasting.

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