Science Images of the Month – January, 2015

Posted January 30th, 2015 at 10:07 pm (UTC-4)
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NASA released this Hubble Space Telescope image of the Eagle Nebula’s “Pillars of Creation” on 1/6/15.  After comparing photos taken in 1996 and 2014, astronomers noticed that a narrow jet-like feature that may have been ejected from a newly forming star expanded its length over the nearly 19 year period. (Reuters/NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team)

NASA released this Hubble Space Telescope image of the Eagle Nebula’s “Pillars of Creation” on January 6. After comparing photos taken in 1996 and 2014, astronomers noticed that a narrow jet-like feature that may have been ejected from a newly forming star expanded its length over the nearly 19 year period. (Reuters/NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team)

An attendee shakes hands with a 3D-printed robotic prosthetic arm, on 1/7/15 at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. (AP)

An attendee shakes hands with a 3D-printed robotic prosthetic arm, January 7 at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. (AP)

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon ISS resupply spacecraft lifts-off from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. SpaceX attempted to land the booster rocket on a barge in the Atlantic, after the launch, but it crashed instead. (AP)

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon ISS resupply spacecraft lifts-off from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on January 10.  SpaceX attempted to land the booster rocket on a barge in the Atlantic, after the launch, but it crashed instead. (AP)

1/12/15, two days after being launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft was successfully captured by the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm.  The Dragon brought fresh supplies to the orbital outpost. (Reuters/NASA-TV)

On January 12, two days after being launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft was successfully captured by the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm. The Dragon brought fresh supplies to the orbital outpost. (Reuters/NASA-TV)

On 1/23/15, NASA released this image of an expanding shell of debris that was left after a massive star exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud.  The image was constructed with information from both the Chandra X-Ray Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope.  (Reuters/NASA/CXC/SAO)

NASA released this image of an expanding shell of debris that was left after a massive star exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud on January 12. The image was constructed with information from both the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope. (Reuters/NASA/CXC/SAO)

On 1/14/15, Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. and NRG Energy unveiled a solar array that was built atop the Phoenician Resort in Scottsdale, Ariz.  The array features 2,000 photovoltaic solar panels and will produce about 600 kilowatts of power.  (Invision for NRG Renew/AP)

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. and NRG Energy unveiled a solar array on January 14 that was built atop the Phoenician Resort in Scottsdale, Ariz. The array features 2,000 photovoltaic solar panels and will produce about 600 kilowatts of power. (Invision for NRG Renew/AP)

This is a 61,000 light year long stretch of the Andromeda Galaxy, located more than 2 million light years away. Released on 1/6/15, this is the largest NASA Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled.  (Reuters/NASA/ESA)

This is a 61,000 light year long stretch of the Andromeda Galaxy, located more than 2 million light years away. Released on January 6, this is the largest NASA Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled. (Reuters/NASA/ESA)

Humanoid robots follow a verbal command to dance to the music at Tokyo’s Robi Cafe on 1/15/15.  The robots can recognize more than 200 Japanese phrases that instruct them to walk, dance, or kick a ball. (AP)

Humanoid robots follow a verbal command to dance to the music at Tokyo’s Robi Cafe on January 15. The robots can recognize more than 200 Japanese phrases that instruct them to walk, dance, or kick a ball. (AP)

The European Space Agency’s IXV Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle, which is seen here on its payload adapter, is being prepared for launch on 1/28/125 at the Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. (©ESA/M. Pedoussaut)

The European Space Agency’s IXV Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle, which is seen here on its payload adapter, is being prepared for launch on January 28 at the Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. (©ESA/M. Pedoussaut)

Sony displayed a prototype of its SmartEyeglass Attach on 1/5/15 at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), in Las Vegas. (AP)

Sony displayed a prototype of its SmartEyeglass Attach on January 5 at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), in Las Vegas. (AP)

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) recently released this photo of the cometary globule CG4, also called “God’s Hand” that was imaged by its Very Large Telescope (VLT).  ESO says the exact nature of CG4 remains a mystery. (ESO)

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) recently released this photo of the cometary globule CG4, also called “God’s Hand” that was imaged by its Very Large Telescope (VLT). ESO says the exact nature of CG4 remains a mystery. (ESO)

A 1/6/15 photo of some dancing spider-like robots that were displayed by Intel at this year’s International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.  The robots were built by University of Arizona graduate student Matt Bunting.  (Reuters)

Dancing spider-like robots that were displayed  by Intel January 6 at this year’s International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The robots were built by University of Arizona graduate student Matt Bunting. (Reuters)

Rick Pantaleo
Rick Pantaleo maintains the Science World blog and writes stories for VOA’s web and radio on a variety of science, technology and health topics. He also occasionally appears on various VOA programs to talk about the latest scientific news. Rick joined VOA in 1992 after a 20 year career in commercial broadcasting.

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