Showing Archived Posts

Building An Internet Bridge To Iran

Posted February 17th, 2012 at 10:37 pm (UTC-4)
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The Battles To Keep Iran’s Web Up And Running Doug Bernard | Washington DC It’s no secret the Iranian government doesn’t much care for the Internet. At least, when it comes to their own citizens. While maintaining its oil and financial industries’ links to the rest of the world via the Internet, Tehran continues to […]

Tags: , , Posted in Freedom

Censoring Twitter?

Posted January 31st, 2012 at 2:15 pm (UTC-4)
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Twitter’s New Policy And Debate About Online Speech Doug Bernard | Washington DC The announcement caught many Internet analysts off guard. Late last week, on January 26th, the micro-blogging site Twitter said it was implementing changes that would allow it to withhold content from specific nations upon request. In other words, if a government asked, […]

UPDATE: Wiki Blackout, One Day Later

Posted January 19th, 2012 at 3:07 pm (UTC-4)
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Just What, If Anything, Did Wednesday’s Protest Achieve? Doug Bernard | Washington DC UPDATE: Friday, January 20, 2012: Not content to leave the battle un-joined, the hacker group Anonymous stepped into the SOPA fray Thursday evening by launching a massive denial of service attack on several SOPA supporters, including Universal Music, the RIAA and MPAA. […]

The Web and The Kremlin

Posted December 14th, 2011 at 5:18 pm (UTC-4)
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The Internet and Social Media Snap at Putin Doug Bernard | Washington DC There are few things worse for a politician than losing an election. One of those is being mocked. Just ask Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.  In late November, two weeks before parliamentary elections, Putin decided to appear on live television to introduce […]

UPDATE: SMS vs. the King

Posted December 6th, 2011 at 7:30 pm (UTC-4)
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Thailand’s Expanding Crackdown on Free Speech and Lese Majeste Doug Bernard | Washington DC UPDATE, December 7, 2011: A Thai court has sentenced American citizen Joe Gordon to 2 1/2 years in Thai prison for admitting to posting weblinks to a banned biography of King Bhumibol Adulyadej which was found to violate lese majeste. The […]

Four Degrees of Facebook?

Posted November 23rd, 2011 at 5:22 pm (UTC-4)
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And the Campaign Against “Breaking The Internet” Doug Bernard | Washington DC Periodically we like to share a few of the stories and posts from across the web that caught our eye.  There are no editorial threads implied connecting these items together, other than being interesting. #1: What’s With The “Weirdness” from China? There’s been […]

The Web Goes World Wide

Posted November 21st, 2011 at 6:47 pm (UTC-4)
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Who’s Online Now, and Who’s Coming Next With the creation in 1989 of the “HyperText Transfer Protocol” by researcher Tim Berners-Lee, the Internet has been synonymous with what’s called the “World Wide Web.” (That name, incidentally, was also Berners-Lee’s idea.) The phrase, like Berners-Lee’s new computer language, is elegant, compact and easily grasped. But for […]

Tags: Posted in Freedom

Anonymous vs. the Zetas

Posted November 1st, 2011 at 3:30 pm (UTC-4)
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And Taking the OWS Protests Online Doug Bernard | Washington DC Periodically we like to share a few of the stories and posts from across the web that caught our eye. There are no editorial threads implied connecting these items together, other than being interesting. #1: Anonymous vs. the Zetas.  Over the last year, the […]

This and That

Posted October 13th, 2011 at 5:57 pm (UTC-4)
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Digital Frontiers editor Doug Bernard is away from his screen this week.  In his absence, we invite you to follow some of the following DF-related items. Malware is certainly making its way to portable devices, and in particular, the Android platform is under attack.  A  fake application is sneaking onto Android devices, with what is […]

Posted in Freedom, Identity, Privacy

Who’s Censoring Whom?

Posted October 7th, 2011 at 9:54 pm (UTC-4)
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And Why Digital Storage May Not Be Forever Doug Bernard | Washington DC Periodically we like to share a few of the stories and posts from across the web that caught our eye.  There are no editorial threads implied connecting these items together, other than being interesting. #1: Who’s Censoring Whom? The Brookings Institute think […]

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What’s Digital Frontiers?

The Internet, mobile phones, tablet computers and other digital devices are transforming our lives in fundamental and often unpredictable ways. “Digital Frontiers” investigates how real world concepts like privacy, identity, security and freedom are evolving in the virtual world.

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