Help Your Lungs, Eat Tomatoes!

If you are a former smoker and would like to help your lungs, a new study, from scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, suggest that you eat more fruit, especially tomatoes and apples.

The study, published in the European Respiratory Journal finds, over a 10-year period, ex-smokers who ate a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, had a slower natural decline in lung function.

The researchers suggest that there are certain elements in the fruit that could be helping to repair the damaged lungs of the former smokers.

The findings were based on data gathered by the Ageing Lungs in European Cohorts study.

Oh, and if you think eating more pizza, spaghetti or other dishes made with processed tomatoes and fruit will do the trick – the researchers say, sorry, the restorative effect only works with fresh fruit products.

Hundreds of voices take the stage during Illinois American Choral Directors Association conference 2017 (College of DuPage via Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

Hundreds of voices take the stage during Illinois American Choral Directors Association conference 2017 (College of DuPage via Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

Sing For Joy

If you’re living with mental health conditions such as anxiety or depression, a study, published in the British Medical Journal, suggests singing with a vocal group or choir can help make you happier.

Researchers from England’s University of East Anglia say they found those who participate in community singing were able to improve or at least maintain their mental health.

They found that the combination of singing and socializing with a group of people can play an important role in recovering from anxiety and depression because it boosts feelings of belonging and wellbeing.

The researchers spent six months interviewing and conducting focus groups with participants of the Sing Your Heart Out project, a Norfolk County England based organization that provides group singing sessions and other social events.

Cosmic rays interacting with the Earth's atmosphere producing ions that helps turn small aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei -- seeds on which liquid water droplets form to make clouds. (llustration - H. Svensmark/DTU)

Cosmic rays interacting with the Earth’s atmosphere producing ions that helps turn small aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei — seeds on which liquid water droplets form to make clouds. (llustration – H. Svensmark/DTU)

Cosmic Rays Found to Influence Earth Climate

In a new study, scientists from the Technical University of Denmark, provide newly found evidence that cosmic rays play a role in cloud formation, which in turn impacts our climate.

Cosmic rays are actually a form of fast-moving, high-energy radiation that emanates from the sun to sources light years away from our solar system.

According to the study, as cosmic rays interact with the atmosphere they produce ions, charged atomic particles, which helps form and grow cloud condensation nuclei, which are particles needed to produce clouds.

The Danish scientists write that the number of these cloud condensation nuclei varies whenever ionization in the atmosphere changes, the amount of these particles can alter the properties of clouds.

The study suggests more particles can mean more clouds and a colder climate, and vice versa.

A 3.465 billion year-old fossil microorganism from Western Australia (J. William Schopf/UCLA Center for the Study of Evolution and the Origin of Life)

A 3.465 billion-year-old fossil microorganism from Western Australia (J. William Schopf/UCLA Center for the Study of Evolution and the Origin of Life)

Study: Life May Be Common in the Universe

Scientists from two American universities (University of California, Los Angeles and University of Wisconsin) have uncovered new evidence that suggests life in the universe may be more common than thought.

The researchers analyzed a diverse collection of microorganism fossils, they’ve confirmed to be nearly 3.5 billion-years-old.

At that age, the scientists say they are the oldest fossils found so far.

The researchers say their analysis revealed that two of the microorganism species seemed to have carried out an ancient type of photosynthesis, another produced methane gas, and it appeared two other species ingested and used methane to build their cell walls.

Researchers say their new found evidence of the evolution of a variety of organisms during Earth’s early history coupled with the countless number stars and the planets that orbit them supports the growing understanding that life can exist throughout the universe.

Rainy day woman (CC Public Domain via PxHere)

Rainy day woman (CC Public Domain via PxHere)

No Link Found between Rainy Days and Joint Pain

It’s raining outside and your back and joints are aching so there’s got to be a connection between the two right?

Well, according to a new study – not really.

Researchers at the Harvard Medical School have released a new study that suggests there is no link between rainy days and joint or back pain.

The Harvard researchers made their findings after sifting through and analyzing insurance records of more than 11 million doctor visits by older Americans between 2008 and 2012 along with daily rainfall data gathered by thousands of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather stations.

Study leader Anupam Jena, a Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard, says that no matter how we looked at the data, we didn’t see any connection between rainfall and physician visits for joint or back pain.