#TravelThursday: Confessions of a Solo Traveler

Posted June 25th, 2015 at 12:21 pm (UTC-4)
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Triwik at Macchu Picchu, Peru

Triwik at Macchu Picchu, Peru

Have you ever traveled solo?

I love traveling. I mostly like traveling by myself – called ‘solo traveling.’ I have traveled solo in countries in Asia, Europe, North America and South America.

People often ask me why I like solo traveling.

“Aren’t you afraid?”

“Don’t you get lonely?”

Back in my home country of Indonesia, it is not common for a female to travel by herself. My first time traveling abroad alone was in 2010. When I told my mom about my plans to travel around Europe by myself, she was worried.

“What if you get lost? Who is going to help you?” my mom asked.

I had to convince her that I had planned everything ahead and I was going to be fine. I left her contacts and addresses of my friends in Europe so she would know where I was going to stay during the trip.

I traveled around Europe that winter for 18 days. I visited six countries – the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Germany, Denmark, and Sweden. I saw the Eiffel Tower and – for the first time in my life – snow!

I like to travel alone because it can be hard to find travel buddies with the same interests and schedules as me. I thought that if I just waited around for someone to travel with me, I might never actually go to the places that I wanted to visit.

In 2012, for instance, I decided to travel to the United Kingdom to watch my favorite soccer team, Manchester United, play. I actually asked some friends to travel with me, but they were unsure whether they could go or not. Since I was tired of waiting for them, I decided to go to the U.K. by myself. I was able to watch two MU games at Old Trafford, tour around the stadium and even have a look inside the players’ locker room.

Another reason why I like solo traveling is that I can plan my own itineraries without depending on other people. I can also set my own pace — meaning I can walk fast or slowly without having to wait for someone, or have them wait for me.

I have never felt lonely while traveling solo, because I always meet other travelers from around the globe. We travelers help each other out. When I traveled to Peru in 2014, for instance, a traveler from Iceland gave me mosquito repellent when I was about to go to the Amazon Jungle. The mosquito repellent is useful to prevent mosquito bites. An Argentinean and a Singaporean also kindly took me to the bus stop in Lima when I was about to take a bus at night. A year later, I still keep in touch with the people I met while traveling.

I also write about my travel adventures. So far, I have published two travel books based on my trips around Europe.

My mom no longer worries when I travel by myself. She knows that I can take care of myself. Now when I tell her that I have travel plans, she says, “You will travel alone? Take care!”

Here are some tips on how to travel safely as a solo traveler:

  • Keep emergency contacts and addresses, such as the embassy of your country, the police, hospitals, relatives and friends.
  • Make copies of your travel documents like passports and keep them in different places. It is also always good to save them on a flash drive and also email them to your family members.
  • Avoid carrying electronic devices like cellphones on your hands while walking around the streets, in the crowds or public transports. Also avoid listening music through earphones while walking around. It might decrease your awareness.
  • Avoid walking alone in dark alleys at night. This might sound like a cliché, but it is better to be safe than sorry. I always try to get back to my hostel before 9 p.m. for safety reasons.
  • If you get lost, ask somebody who you can trust, like officials at a tourist information center.
  • Trust your feelings. If somebody asks you to go somewhere, but you don’t know if you can trust him/her, then just don’t go.

What do you think about solo traveling? Have you ever traveled abroad alone?

 

Words in This Blog

travel buddies n. someone to travel with

mosquito repellent n. a substance that keeps mosquito away

flash drive n. data storage device  

alleys n. narrow streets

cliché n. something that is commonly used in books, stories, etc.

hostel – n. an inexpensive place to stay for travelers

8 Insider Tips for Scholarship Interviews

Posted June 11th, 2015 at 1:36 pm (UTC-4)
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Florida State University

 

Most scholarship programs require in-person interviews to advance to the final selection phase. For two years, I was on a selection panel for a prestigious international scholarship program. I interviewed hundreds of candidates. I would like to share with you how the interview process works from the panelist’s (or interviewer’s) point of view.

Before the interview, the panelists only know the applicants on paper. Many of my co-panelists only looked through the files quickly a few minutes before the candidate walked into the room. When you walk in the room, this is your chance bring your application to life. The interview should transform you, in the mind of the panelist, from a pile of papers into a real person with a compelling story. Here’s my advice for applicants going into the interview:

1.       Don’t be generic. Panelists often interview 10-20 candidates in one day. It can be difficult to remember each applicant, especially at the end of the day. In reality, applicants are often similar in age, background, and study objectives. Your personality and your personal story need to come through in your interview. Panelists probably won’t choose you if they can’t remember you.

2.       Have personal stories to tell. The best way to be memorable is to have a compelling personal story to tell; a story only you can tell. In my experience, the best stories are stories about overcoming challenges. Think carefully about your past. It’s important to have specific stories ready that only you can tell. If a panelist asked you about leadership, have a story ready about a specific situation when you were the leader. Panelists often ask about leadership, cultural adaptability, overcoming challenges, taking initiative, and plans for the future. Keep your stories short and focused.

3.       Convey a strong sense of social purpose. When you apply for a scholarship, you’re asking a government or foundation to give you money. Your sponsor wants a return on investment. They want someone who will spread their values and support their mission for the rest of his or her life. Read the mission statement of the sponsoring organization carefully. Match your goals to its mission.  Most scholarship programs want you to return to your home community and promote reform and progress in your community. Convey a sense of social consciousness if you want to be competitive. Make your study about your community, not you.

4.       Apply to the right program. Many applicants are careless about which programs they apply to. Applicants are often rejected because they are overqualified. For example, applicants with Master’s degrees often apply for Bachelor’s programs. On the other hand, many applicants apply for programs for which they are not qualified.

Read the qualifications carefully for each program. Call the sponsoring organization if you’re unsure. Unfortunately, applicants who did not meet the basic program criteria are sometimes invited to the interview round because of a mistake by the scholarship administration.   Sometimes applicants are not honest in their applications.

5.       Be confident. It’s important to speak at a good volume, maintain eye contact, keep your head up, and have good posture. I was always impressed with applicants who smiled when they entered the room, shook hands with the panelists, sat up straight, and answered questions with confidence and poise. Don’t start with an apology. Don’t be afraid to talk about your accomplishments. But don’t forget to give credit to the people who helped you in your accomplishments.

6.       Know your motivation. Why are you applying for a scholarship? This will probably be the first question you are asked. It is probably the most important.

The most common answer I heard was, “I’ve always been interested in x and it’s always been my dream to study in x.” This is not a compelling answer for most panelists. Why should a government or foundation give tens of thousands of dollars for you to fulfill your personal goals?

A more impressive answer is this: “In my country there is not enough x. The best place to study x is in country x. I want to study x so I can come back to my country and share what I learned about x and develop x in my community.” Panelists are impressed by applicants who have a strong sense of social purpose.

Another warning: never tell a scholarship panel that you want to immigrate to another country. If the panel has doubts about your desire to return home after your scholarship, there’s a good chance they will choose someone else.

7.       Smile. A good way to build rapport with the panelists is to smile and have a sense of humor. You aren’t the only one who is uncomfortable. Panelists get bored and tired, especially if they interview a lot of unqualified applicants. A light sense of humor, when used appropriately, is often appreciated and can help you stand out. If you can make the panelists smile, there’s a good chance you can take control of the interview and steer the conversation toward your strengths.

8.       Be lucky. Most applicants are ranked as average. They are not highly qualified, but they’re not terrible. Let’s say there are 10 applicants. The panelists will probably remember the best two applicants and the two least-qualified applicants. Applicants who are ranked in the middle have to be very lucky to be chosen. Panelists probably won’t spend too much time debating why number 3 is better than number 8.

There is also the luck factor in who is on your panel. Each panelist has his/her own biases and preferences. I remember a few times when my highest-ranked candidate was another panelist’s lowest-ranked candidate. Scholarship selection is not a science. Some panelists are friendly and ask easy questions. Others are aggressive and will grill you with tough questions.

Scholarship decisions are sometimes random and unfair. But, you can increase your chances of being lucky by being persistent and well prepared.

The Bottom Line

The best scholarships programs are very competitive.  Some scholarships are worth hundreds of thousands of dollars in college expenses. They are potentially worth millions of dollars in future lifetime earnings. Don’t expect it to be easy. Most applicants fail the first, second, and even third time. Keep trying. Learn from each experience. Never stop improving your skills, especially your English. The people who get the scholarship are not always the smartest—they are hardest working.

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Adam Brock

Tips to get a scholarship abroad

Posted June 10th, 2015 at 1:47 pm (UTC-4)
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Students throw inflatable globes into the air as they celebrate graduation during Harvard University commencement exercises. (AP Photo)

Students throw inflatable globes into the air as they celebrate graduation during Harvard University commencement exercises. (AP Photo)

Hello everyone,

I am Triwik, an intern at VOA Learning English. I am also a graduate student in Communication and Development Studies at Ohio University, here in the United States. I got a scholarship for a two-year master’s degree from Fulbright. The Fulbright scholarship is an international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government.

It is a challenge to get a scholarship abroad. But it does not mean that you cannot get it. Here are some tips that might help you get a scholarship abroad.

* The first thing to do is ask yourself: what program do you want to do?

Do you want to do a non-degree, bachelor’s degree, master’s degree or doctoral degree? It is best to choose a program that matches your career.

My first scholarship was a non-degree scholarship to help me improve my journalism skills. Then I realized that it was not enough. After getting my undergraduate degree in Indonesia, I felt the need to increase my research skills by obtaining a master’s degree.

* After carefully choosing academic program that you want, you should start looking for information on scholarships. You can get the information from social media networks, such as Facebook and Twitter. You can also subscribe to newsletters or join mailing lists. For information on scholarships sponsored by the US government, go to www.educationusa.state.gov.

* After you choose the scholarship program, it is time to get busy on the application. This can be very time-consuming.

Scholarship providers usually ask you to fill-out application forms. They will also ask for a motivation letter, which states the reasons why you apply for the scholarship; a resume or a curriculum vitae, which lists your educational background, working experiences and skills; a proof of language proficiency score and reference letter(s).

A reference letter is a letter provided by a person who can give vouch for your character and skills. For my master’s degree, I asked for reference letters from my former lecturer and employers.

As for the motivation letter, it is good to have a native speaker to check the grammar and the organization of the letter. I asked for an American colleague to check my mine.

*  The next step is strengthening your language ability.

If you are a non-English speaker who decides to study in an English-speaking environment, you will need to take English tests like TOEFL (Test of English as Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language testing System). You can borrow study guides at the library or get them online. There are some websites that provide free test samples. To improve your speaking skills, you can ask your friends to practice English. I used to speak to myself in the mirror to practice my English. I was pretending to have conversations with somebody. It helped me a lot.

* There are some stages in scholarship application, from administration process to interview. In an interview, interviewers usually ask about your academic background, skills and work experiences; the reasons why you apply for the program; your chosen program/university, your future goals after finishing the program; your ability to handle issues/problems, and your strengths and weaknesses.

As for the number of interviewers, it depends on the program that you apply for. When I applied for journalism training in Germany, there was only one interviewer. But when I applied for master’s degree in the United Kingdom and the U.S., there were three interviewers – two Indonesians and one non-Indonesian.

* Send as many applications as you can to increase your chance in getting a scholarship.

It took me two years to get a master’s-degree scholarship. In 2012, I applied for three scholarships and I did not even get one. I sent five applications in 2013. To my surprise, I got accepted for two of them. I chose the one in the U.S. because I felt that I would learn more in the U.S., especially in the field of communication.

* Other important keys are strong motivation, determination, hard work and a never-give-up fighting spirit.

If you fail in getting a scholarship this year, you can always send other applications next year. A wise man once said that failure teaches success.

I always try to learn from my failure. When I did not get a scholarship in 2012, I improved my English ability, revised my motivation letter, and strengthened my professional skills.

 

So, what are you waiting for? A scholarship could be within your reach. Feel free to ask me if you have any questions.

 

Want to study abroad? Try to get a scholarship!

Posted June 8th, 2015 at 2:34 pm (UTC-4)
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Hi everyone!

My name is Triwik and I am from Indonesia. I am currently studying for a master’s degree in Communication and Development Studies at Ohio University in the United States.

Many people ask me: “Do you pay for your study out of your own pocket?”

No, I don’t, because I received a scholarship. It means that I do not have to pay for the tuition fee. I also get a monthly stipend. I want to share my experiences in applying for scholarships abroad to all of you.

Triwik at Ohio University, United States

Triwik at Ohio University, United States

Studying abroad has been my childhood dream. It is not cheap to study in a foreign country. Therefore, I tried to get a scholarship to fund my study. My first experience applying for a scholarship was in 2011. I applied for a scholarship to do a two-month journalism training program in environmental reporting in Berlin, Germany.

To apply for the scholarship, I had to write a motivation letter stating the reasons why I wanted to apply for it. I also attached a resume, which listed my educational background and work experience.

The German embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, later invited me for an interview. The interviewer asked about my motivations in applying for the scholarship and my working experiences in dealing with environmental issues.

I got the scholarship! The German government paid for my round-trip airfare, accommodation, and transportation costs in Germany. It was a great opportunity to meet environmental experts and journalists from Asia, Africa, and Europe.

I later decided to apply for a scholarship to pursue a master’s degree. I wanted to increase my skills in communication and media. Since English is not my first language, I had to take either TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing System) tests to prove that I could function in an English-speaking environment. I decided to take IELTS because the scholarships that I applied for required an IELTS score. I took the IELTS twice. My first IELTS score was 6.5. It was actually not bad. But I decided to take another one to increase my chance in getting a scholarship. The second time I took the IELTS, I got a 7.

In 2012, I applied for scholarships in the United Kingdom, Australia and Denmark. An institution in the U.K. invited me for an interview. However, I did not get the scholarship. I was very disappointed because I was one step closer to studying in the U.K. The disappointment grew even deeper when I did not get the scholarships in Australia and Denmark.

I did not give up. In 2013, I applied for five scholarships. One of them was a program to study in the U.S. funded by Fulbright. The Fulbright program is an international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government. I sent the application forms, a motivation letter, and a resume. I also attached three reference letters from my employers and a former lecturer.

Fulbright invited me for an interview in Jakarta. There were three people interviewing me. They asked about my motivations in studying in the U.S., my chosen program and universities and my goals after finishing my study. A few weeks later, Fulbright offered me the scholarship!

But the process did not end there. I still had to take the TOEFL iBT (internet-based TOEFL) and GRE (Graduate Record Examination) tests to enroll in universities in the U.S. The GRE is an admission test for graduate school.

I studied hard for the tests. I had to juggle study and and my work at The Jakarta Post, an English-language daily newspaper based in Jakarta. I usually studied in the morning because I had to work in the afternoon. I also bought the TOEFL iBT and GRE study guides, which were expensive. I took the TOEFL iBT test twice because the first score was below the required standard. The second score was much better. The entire process – from sending application, doing an interview and taking English tests – took about eight months.

No pain, no gain. After going through the long process, I finally received an offer from Ohio University to do a two-year master’s degree in Communication and Development Studies. Fulbright paid for my flights, tuition and health insurance. It also gave me a monthly stipend.

Besides being able to study abroad for free, I also have the opportunity to work in the U.S. as an intern at Voice of America. I am excited to learn more about the media in the U.S. and on how international media works. I hope that this internship opportunity will enhance my communication skills and build a network that will be useful for my future career.

So, if you really want to study abroad and get an internship, go for it! If I can do it, you can do it!

If you are interested in studying in the U.S., you can log on to: http://educationusa.state.gov

 

Words in this story

tuition n. the money that we should pay to go to school

stipend n. a regular payment, as an allowance 

eligible n. qualified

enroll – v. register

juggle – v. to do several things at the same time

no pain, no gain – a motto which means that hard work will give you greater value

 

 

 

 

Five Things That Have Surprised Me About College Life in America

Posted June 3rd, 2015 at 4:51 pm (UTC-4)
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Triwik at Ohio University, United States

Triwik at Ohio University, United States

Hi all!

My name is Triwik, and I am a summer intern here at VOA Learning English. Every week, I will write a blog post here about my experiences as an international student in the United States.

I am from Surakarta, Indonesia. I am currently studying for my master’s degree at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. This is my first time studying in the U.S. I received my bachelor’s degree in economics in Indonesia.

I began my master’s degree program in the fall of 2014. I have already noticed many differences between universities in the U.S. and universities in Indonesia.  It has been a challenge for me studying in the U.S. because Indonesia has a different academic culture than that of in the U.S.

Here are a few things that have surprised me:

*One major difference is class participation. Here in the U.S., students are encouraged to be active and involved in discussions. You are free to share your thoughts and opinions in class. University students in Indonesia, on the other hand, somehow tend to be “passive” as they only listen to the lecturers.

*Second, in terms of lecturer-student interaction, the relationship between lecturers and students in the U.S. is less formal. My professors at Ohio University, for instance, asked me to use their first names instead of using “Professor” or their last names. In Indonesia, it is a different situation. To address your lecturer, you have to call him/her “Mr.” or “Mrs.” It is considered impolite to use only first name.

*As for the clothing, Indonesian students have to dress “properly”—no flip-flops, no shorts, and no sleeveless tops. In the U.S., you can wear all of those in class! One thing that I like in the U.S. is that you can eat and drink in class! I cannot do that in my home country because eating and drinking in class would be considered impolite.

*Writing research papers and keeping up with the readings are the most challenging tasks for me. A professor might assign 100-page of reading materials per week. At first, it was hard for me to do all of the readings. But better time management has helped me keep up with the reading requirements.

*Since English is not my mother tongue, writing research papers in English is not easy either. I went to the university’s writing center for help. The center provides tutors to help students with writing research papers or essays.

It has been nine months since I started studying in the U.S. In that short time, I feel that I have adjusted myself to the active-learning system of American academic culture.

Do you have any questions for me about studying at U.S. universities? Have you studied in another country before? Write to us in the comments section! 

 

Pirates or Freedom Fighters?

Posted April 21st, 2015 at 10:29 am (UTC-4)
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Photo: Richard Termini for Horizon Theatre Rep

Horizon Theatre Rep 2011 production of Benito Cereno by Robert Lowell, Directed by Woodie King Jr. Photo: Richard Termini for Horizon Theatre Rep

This week’s American Stories features the second part of Herman Melville’s story, “Benito Cereno.” We learned in the first part of the story that the ship Melville called the San Dominick was carrying slaves from Chile to Peru in 1799. This was part of the slave trade that took place in the Spanish colonial empire. The slaves took charge of the ship one night. They asked the captain to take them to a place where they could be free.

In the second part of the story, another ship finds the San Dominick. The captain of that ship came aboard to see what was wrong. He noticed the disorder on the ship.

Reading this story, I felt sympathy for the slaves. They were sold in Africa and brought across the Atlantic Ocean to South America. They were forced to work for the Spanish colonists. Life must have been very hard for them.

So who is at fault here? The sailors who agree to transport slaves or the slaves who want to be free? Are the slaves pirates for trying to take the ship, or are they fighting for the freedom they deserve? Should the sailors take the slaves to freedom or turn them in to continued enslavement?

Jaymes Jorsling and Rafael De Mussa in Benito Cereno - Photo: Richard Termini for Horizon Theatre Rep (Courtesy Photo)

Jaymes Jorsling and Rafael De Mussa in Benito Cereno – Photo: Richard Termini for Horizon Theatre Rep (Courtesy Photo)

This story may remind you of a situation in your country’s history. Write to us in the comments section.

 

Yours,

Dr. Jill

What does it mean to be a citizen?

Posted February 20th, 2015 at 4:34 pm (UTC-4)
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A movement has begun in the United States to require that high school students pass a test on U.S. history and government before they graduate. The test is the same one given to immigrants who want to become naturalized citizens.

We-The-People

Our education report this weekend tells about new state laws on the requirement. The laws caused some debate among educators. They say students have enough tests already. One more test will not make them better citizens, they think.

On the other hand, some think there is not enough instruction on how to be a good citizen in a democracy. A sign of this is the low number of voters who participate in U.S. elections.

Supporters of the new laws think the test will encourage schools to spend more effort teaching this subject, which is called civics. When Americans think of civics, we often think of taking part in activities to improve our community, volunteering, or supporting our favorite candidates for public office.

What do you think about this movement? Does the education system in your country focus on how to be a good citizen? Do schools teach students to be active members of their communities? How would you describe what  ’good citizens’ in your community do?

Write a paragraph or two giving your opinion in the comments section. I will give you feedback on your grammar and writing.

Dr. Jill

 

Good Academic Writing Doesn’t Have to Be A Struggle

Posted January 15th, 2015 at 10:23 am (UTC-4)
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Now that you’ve heard our Writing Tips story, let’s take a look at a writing templates from They Say, I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein. A template is a model or preset format for a document.

Here is one of the most basic templates to get your paper started.

In discussions of X, one of the controversial issues has been________________. On one hand, ___________________argues______________________. On the other hand,________________________argues________________________. Even others maintain__________________.  My own view is ____________________________.

 

Here’s an example of the template filled out.

In discussions of the Charlie Hebdo attack one of the controversial issues has been the limits of free speech. On one hand, free speech advocates say that speech should never be regulated, even when it is offensive and blasphemous. On the other hand, some people believe that those who insult religion are asking for trouble and should be stopped. Even others maintain that Western countries are hypocritical about free speech. My own view is that we must find a middle ground between free speech and showing respect for religious faith…

Now it’s your turn. Try filling out the template above with another controversial issue that you’re interested in. Keep it simple. We’ll give feedback to those who stick to the template form. We look forward to hearing from you!

–Adam

 

Who would you want in your lifeboat?

Posted January 2nd, 2015 at 10:09 am (UTC-4)
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SS Commodore

SS Commodore

Our American Stories episode for this week is Stephen Crane’s ‘The Open Boat.‘ In this story, we learn about the experience Crane had after his ship sank on to way to Cuba.  He was on the ship SS Commodore, a steamship. He left from Jacksonville, Florida, on December 31, 1896. Crane was going to report on the war in Cuba. The ship sank on January 2, 1897. Crane and three other men got into a 3-meter-long dinghy. They only reached land 30 hours later.

In the story, we find that the men help each other row the boat and give each other emotional support. I thought as I read this story, “Who would I like to be in my lifeboat?” I imagined what it would be like if a was on a ship that sank. How would I survive in a small boat in the ocean?

Stephen Crane was in a lifeboat with the captain of the SS Commodore, the cook, and a sailor. The captain was good at finding the right direction for the boat to go. The sailor was good at rowing.

Woodcut Courtesy of Robert Quakenbush

Woodcut Courtesy of Robert Quakenbush

In my imaginary lifeboat, I would like someone with strong arms who could row and steer the boat. Also, I would like someone with a cheerful outlook on life to keep the rest of us from being too sad. And I would  like someone who could sing, to pass the hours as we waited for rescue.

I hope I always travel on a boat with my husband, because he would have all of these qualities. So I would make sure to get in the same lifeboat as my husband.

How about you? Write in the comments about the people or person you would most like to be with in a lifeboat.

Dr. Jill Robbins

 

 

How do Martians Raise Their Children?

Posted December 11th, 2014 at 6:08 pm (UTC-4)
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Dear Readers,

Cover of First Printing of A Princess of Mars

Our story in this week’s American Stories is the third part of A Princess of Mars, in which we learn about the Princess Dejah Thoris, a scientist from the city of Helium. She is captured by the green Martians, who will use her in their deadly games.

Sola, a green Martian warrior, explains to John Carter, the Earth human who is telling the story, how her mother died in those games. Sola’s mother broke the rules of her tribe by raising her daughter separately from those of the other children of the tribe. She explains that her tribe forbids children to know who their parents are and parents to know who their children are:

No, John Carter. My mother died in the games. That is a secret you must not tell anyone. The wall where Tars Tarkas found you held eggs that produce our young. All the children belong to the tribe. A mother never knows which child is hers when they come out of the egg.
My mother hid the egg that carried me. It was not placed within the walled area.  She kept her secret until after I was born.  But others discovered her secret and she was condemned to die in the games. She hid me among other children before she was captured. If this secret were learned, I too would die in the games.
Before she left me, my mother told me the name of my father. I alone keep that secret. It would mean death for him as well as me. My people are violent and cruel.

This concept struck me when I read it. I can understand the reason the tribe developed a practice like this: if all are responsible for each member of the tribe equally, they will share with others and not show favoritism for any one individual.

However, the tribe seems to be very warlike, and I wonder if this child-raising practice supports that kind of society. The tribe trains its members to fight against other groups of Martians. Their loyalty is to their own tribe, not to a family group. I guess that this practice – raising their young as members of the tribe but not of a family, means they will be more cruel and violent as warriors.

How would this work on Earth? Do you know of any cultures that raise children in groups, rather than as individuals? What effect does this have on the psychology of the child?

Write in the comments to share your ideas on the Martian practice of raising their children – and how this would work if it was done on Earth.

Looking forward to hearing from you,

Dr. Jill Robbins

About

About

Confessions of an English Learner is a place for you to practice your writing and share the joys and pains of learning the language. We will post a weekly prompt, to give you a chance to practice your writing and to comment on others’ writing.

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